Situation Report 2: Spring Time

Spring is here, which means two things for all us northern dwelling humans, first, warmer weather and second, it’s tire change time!

But before we move on to spring, I want to start by talking about the Ford Escape as a winter vehicle. It’s important to note, that I opted for the front wheel drive model in order to save on fuel. So let’s begin with the good things that it has going for it. The ground clearance is actually fairly good, which is around 7.9 inches. The Subaru Forester is the crossover that usually sets the benchmark in this category and it comes in at 8.7 inches. So you’re left with plenty of room for snow banks and the occasional off the beaten path type road without fearing any damage to important parts underneath your the vehicle. The 2016 Escape is also equipped with a couple 0f nifty features that my 2013 model didn’t have, such as heated mirrors and a heated windshield wiper dock.

Also, the AdvanceTrac system, which is Ford’s stability control system is quite good, when taking a turn on a slippery surface at too great of a speed it will control your turn by applying the brakes to the correct wheels to help the car stay on track. It’s however impossible to disable the system, so it can get kind of annoying when you’re actually trying to have so fun in the curves.

Now on to the disappointing part, the traction control system is terrible, it is far to intrusive, I would go as far as calling it dangerous. Picture this, you’re at a stop sign, the roads are snowy and you want to turn left on a road where the traffic doesn’t have to stop. It’s a busy Monday morning, but you finally have a hole where you can squeeze in so you decide to gas it… and nothing, well almost nothing, the car moves slowly forward into oncoming traffic and there is nothing you can do to make it move faster. The car has detected that the road is slippery and that it should cut the power in order to avoid the wheels from spinning out which could result in the loss of control. Even being delicate with the gas pedal doesn’t work, believe me, I’ve tried it. The only option at your disposal is to move through the settings of the on-board computer and switch the traction control off. This requires a total of 7 clicks on the steering wheel controls to make it happen, not exactly a quick process. Now, try going up a snowy hill without too much momentum with the traction control on, I don’t think I need to tell you about what is going to happen. The system is dangerous and Ford really needs to address this problem.

I had experienced this with my 2013 Ford Escape, which was equipped with the 2.0 Ecoboost and I hoped that decreased power of the 1.6 Ecoboost would make the problem less apparent, but it doesn’t. Just in case anyone was wondering, my winter tires are Toyo Observe GSi5s, which always rank among the top winter tires available.

Should I have opted for the all-wheel drive version? Probably. Even though their system is only on-demand, which means the rear wheels only come to life when the front wheels spin out, it would have been sufficient to mostly avoid the dangers mentioned above.

Since my last report I’ve done 7,224 kilometers or 4489 miles and over that period my fuel efficiency numbers have been 8.5 L / 100 km or around 28 mpg. This represents a drastic improvement since my last report where after 10,658 kilometers or 6623 miles I was averaging 9.7 L / 100 km or around 24 mpg. It’s difficult to assess the exact reason for this, but my assumptions are that I did much more highway driving over this period and also due to the warming weather I probably reduced my idling time quite a bit.

These numbers were all achieved using winter tires, so now that I’ve switched to four season tires, I’m expecting even better numbers. My new tires are the factory provided Michelin Energy Savers, online reviews are fairly poor, however, the tread pattern is basically identical to the Continental tires that came with previous year Escapes and I thought those were quite good so I’m not sure what to expect.

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Michelin Energy Saver (235 / 55 / 17)

Nothing else to report on the vehicle, everything is still running smoothly and thankfully the burnt clutch smell that I was getting after frequent accelerations is a thing of the past.

Until next time!

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Situation Report 1: 2016 Ford Escape

I’ve now been driving my new 2016 Ford Escape for a little over 2-months now. Over that period of time, I’ve completed 10,658 kilometers or 6,623 miles.

As previously mentioned, my 2013 Ford Escape was equipped with the top of the line 2.0 Ecoboost engine, however, this time around I opted for 1.6 Ecoboost engine in order to save on fuel costs. With the 2.0 Ecoboost my fuel efficiency numbers were 11.5 L / 100 km or around 20.5 mpg. So far, with the 1.6 Ecoboost I’ve been doing 9.7 L / 100 km or around 26.1 mpg. A few things to note, every kilometer was done on winter tires (Toyo Observe GSi5), so naturally due to the more aggressive tread pattern, and therefore increased friction with the road, the car will consume more fuel. Also, when traffic permits, I usually travel on the highway at around 115 km/h or around 71 mph and I’ve noticed an unbelievable difference between the fuel consumption at that speed and when traveling anywhere between 90 km/h and 100 km/h. On cruise control at 90 km/h or around 55 mph the car will hold steady at about 6.0 L / 100 km or around 39.2 mpg. The larger 2.0 Ecoboost showed very little difference in fuel consumption at these different speeds. This is something to keep in mind depending on how fast you like to drive.

Now on to the power, there is no way around it, the car is slow. From 0 to 50 km/h it’s actually not bad, however, 70 to 100 km/h is painfully slow. That being said, I was spoiled with the 2.0 Ecoboost. So it’s all a matter of perspective, if you’re used to driving a normal small SUV or sedan that comes with a normally aspirated (non-turbo) engine which would usually range from 1.5 to 2.5 liters, you will be fine with the 1.6 Ecoboost. As for me, I’ve yet to determine if the the drop in fuel consumption, which so far isn’t all that much is worth the drop in power.

Finally, I’ve noticed that when I’m doing frequent accelerations, like when I’m doing a lot of city driving for example, I’ll often notice a burnt smell, very similar to what a burnt clutch would smell like. I’ll keep an eye on this and ask around next time I take the car in for an oil change.

Thankfully, there is nothing else to report on. In a future post, I’ll be writing about the Escape’s most notable update on the 2016 model, the Sync 3 system.